Transform your words, transform your reality

Transform your words, transform your reality

How is it that a bunch of letters arranged into a word can carry so much power? Because the words we choose to use, or more accurately what we associate to these words, can evoke emotions and physical sensations that carry great meaning when we hear them. You see, the words that you hear or use to represent an experience ultimately become your experience. And these words we use to label our experiences also actually have the ability to increase or decrease the intensity of the emotions we feel. For example, imagine when something happens that angers you – if you said quite colourfully that it “really f$#ked you off and made you furious” – these become associations which most likely serve to intensify the anger you feel. On the flipside, you could decrease the emotion by saying that it “bothered you a smidgen”, or “tinkled you” – and these such frivolous labels can even change your emotional state completely because they’re rather amusing! Simple word substitutions like these alter our perception of things. For example, imagine the positive shift in your confidence if you classified the “nervous anxiety” you feel before a big presentation as “excited anticipation”. We’ve tagged associations to words at a subconscious level, and because of this people can link tremendous levels of pain, anxiety and even fear to particular words. I know with ophidiophobia (fear of snakes) clients, just hearing the word “snake” can make their skin crawl or even trigger anxiety symptoms. Another example is a client I worked with who had experienced two traumatic childbirths. In our first session, just mentioning the...
Your words influence the results you get

Your words influence the results you get

Words influence: what you say impacts the results you get.  By understanding how your mind processes the words it hears you can learn to phrase what you say in ways that will positively influence the results you want.   If I say to you “don’t think of a black cat”, notice what happens.  In some shape or form your mind had to make an association of what a black cat is to understand the sentence – maybe a quick image flashed into your mind of a black cat, or you thought of a black cat you knew, or maybe you thought about the superstition about black cats and ladders. Even if you were not consciously aware of this it happened at a subconscious level because the processes that are involved in comprehension had to think about a black cat even though I told you not to.  Therefore the use of words like “don’t” are negated in terms of how the brain comprehends.  In this instant “don’t” was filtered out and your mind obeyed the end of the sentence and thought of a black cat. So if you are consciously telling yourself “don’t eat chocolate” or “must not eat chocolate” you’ll be undermined by the part of your mind that comprehends what it hears and the part that controls your behaviours  – because it is getting the instruction to “eat chocolate”. How about what you tell your kids (or your partner!)?   When the kids are carrying a hot drink and you say “careful don’t spill it” – three things happen: firstly, their brain filters out the “don’t”; secondly, they have...